Bought a piece of fresh young ginger from the farmer’s market yesterday (in Oregon!), and currently have a batch of ginger beer brewing with it. Extraordinarily flavorful, and no tough skin to peel off, just tender new root. It was a bit more expensive than the normal mature root you get in the store, but hopefully it will be worth it!

Bought a piece of fresh young ginger from the farmer’s market yesterday (in Oregon!), and currently have a batch of ginger beer brewing with it. Extraordinarily flavorful, and no tough skin to peel off, just tender new root. It was a bit more expensive than the normal mature root you get in the store, but hopefully it will be worth it!

The New Family Receipt Book (Philadelphia, 1818)

The New Family Receipt Book (Philadelphia, 1818)

Samuel and Sarah Adams, The Complete Servant; Being a Practical Guide to the Peculiar Duties and Business of all Descriptions of Servants (London, 1825)
Available via Google Books.

Samuel and Sarah Adams, The Complete Servant; Being a Practical Guide to the Peculiar Duties and Business of all Descriptions of Servants (London, 1825)

Available via Google Books.

The Cottager’s Monthly Visitor, Volume 5 (London, 1825)
Available via Google Books.

The Cottager’s Monthly Visitor, Volume 5 (London, 1825)

Available via Google Books.


Esther Copely, The Housekeeper’s Guide, or, A Plain and Practical System of Domestic Cookery (London, 1838)
Available via Google Books.

Esther Copely, The Housekeeper’s Guide, or, A Plain and Practical System of Domestic Cookery (London, 1838)

Available via Google Books.

Esther Copely, The Housekeeper’s Guide, or, A Plain and Practical System of Domestic Cookery (London, 1838)
Available via Google Books.

Esther Copely, The Housekeeper’s Guide, or, A Plain and Practical System of Domestic Cookery (London, 1838)

Available via Google Books.

"A glowing sensation in the stomach"

From The Monthly Magazine; Or, British Register, Volume 40, Issue 3, 1815.

To the Editor of the Monthly Magazine.

SIR,

A much approved and, it is said, a very wholesome beverage has been of late manufactured in this popular town, and also at Lewes, a few miles distant from hence, well known by the name of ginger-beer, which has almost superseded the use of spruce-beer, soda-water, &c. &c. So great has been the consumption of this ginger-beer, that there are two or three manufactories established in this town, and two at Lewes, for preparing it. In the latter place, we find the article is carefully distinguished by the names of Pitt’s Ginger-Beer, and Imperial Ginger-Beer of a superior quality by J. King; the former claims considerably a priority in establishment, the latter being but recently established. Much pains have been taken by these ginger-beer merchants to recommend their commodity to public notice, upon which they have stamped many very high qualities, which I shall not take upon me here to dispute. It is, however, certain, in this beverage, as in many other beverages, that its best introduction to general use arises from its agreeableness to our palate, and not from its entire valuable properties to our constitution. The ginger-beer has been much used from its being peculiarly grateful to the palate, and occasioning a glowing sensation in the stomach immediately after it is taken. Much has been also said as to the valuable medicinal qualities of this ginger beverage: whether it really possesses any or not, I have not ascertained. It is obvious that a beverage so much approved, and prepared with so little expence, as the ginger-beer is, has induced many persons to manufacture the article at home; as the expence of preparing it by no means warrants the high price it is sold at in the shops, by which these ginger-beer merchants necessarily derive a most enormous profit. The ginger-beer, of a very superior quality, may be prepared as follows: — Powder of ginger, 1 ounce; cream of tartar, half an ounce; a large lemon, sliced; 2 lb. lump sugar, and one gallon of water, added together, and simmered over the fire for half an hour; and fermented, in the usual way, with a table-spoonful of yeast, and bottle it close for use. — It may be proper to observe that it should be put in such bottles as are used for soda-water, and closely corked.          T. Rayner

Brighton; Sept. 6, 1815

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Mary Randolph, The Virginia Housewife: Or, Methodical Cook (Baltimore, 1838).
Available via Google Books.

Mary Randolph, The Virginia Housewife: Or, Methodical Cook (Baltimore, 1838).

Available via Google Books.

The Melodist, and Mirthful Olio, Volume IV (London, 1829)
Available via Google Books.

The Melodist, and Mirthful Olio, Volume IV (London, 1829)

Available via Google Books.

Boy’s Life, Volume 1, Number 1, March 1, 1911
Available via Google Books.

Boy’s Life, Volume 1, Number 1, March 1, 1911

Available via Google Books.